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Research Proposal

The process for presenting your dissertation research topic can vary widely depending on the university. Some of the major universities require a prospectus, while others ask for a precis or a concept paper. Still others have specialized initial deliverables for topic approval.

At Nfojo Research, regardless of the exact form your pre-dissertation materials take, we can assist you to ensure this document provides you with a firm foundation (as any blueprint should) by:

 

  • Discussing the researcher’s general interests for the study
  • Discussing sample size and data collection
  • Identifying a current and significant research gap
  • Developing the problem statement and theoretical framework
  • Ensuring that the research questions, hypotheses, instrumentation, and sampling plan are aligned with the problem statement
  • Determining the best methodological approach
  • Developing your full prospectus or concept paper

 

The aims of this initial conversation are twofold: to discuss your goals for your doctoral research, and clarify what is realistic for you in terms of sample size and data collection to ensure a feasible research proposal, which will require:

 

Reviewing researcher’s university requirements and guidelines
Completing an extensive literature search via ProQuest, JSTOR, PubMed, ERIC, and EBSCOhost
Ensuring that the research questions (and hypotheses), instrumentation, and sampling plan maintain alignment with the research gap
Presenting each of the foundational elements (problem, purpose, research questions, and methodology) in polished academic prose
Discussing presented literature in past tense. Presenting the proposed in future tense to clearly indicate that the research is pending approval